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Hitler & America / Klaus P. Fischer.

Publication | Not Digitized | Library Call Number: DD247.H5 F525 2011

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    Book cover

    Overview

    Summary
    Overview: In February 1942, barely two months after he had declared war on the United States, Adolf Hitler praised America's great industrial achievements and admitted that Germany would need some time to catch up. The Americans, he said, had shown the way in developing the most efficient methods of production-especially in iron and coal, which formed the basis of modern industrial civilization. He also touted America's superiority in the field of transportation, particularly the automobile. He loved automobiles and saw in Henry Ford a great hero of the industrial age. Hitler's personal train was even code-named "Amerika." In Hitler and America, historian Klaus P. Fischer seeks to understand more deeply how Hitler viewed America, the nation that was central to Germany's defeat. He reveals Hitler's split-minded image of America: America and Amerika. Hitler would loudly call the United States a feeble country while at the same time referring to it as an industrial colossus worthy of imitation. Or he would belittle America in the vilest terms while at the same time looking at the latest photos from the United States, watching American films, and amusing himself with Mickey Mouse cartoons. America was a place that Hitler admired-for the can-do spirit of the American people, which he attributed to their Nordic blood-and envied-for its enormous territorial size, abundant resources, and political power. Amerika, however, was to Hitler a mongrel nation, grown too rich too soon and governed by a capitalist elite with strong ties to the Jews. Across the Atlantic, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt had his own, far more realistically grounded views of Hitler. Fischer contrasts these with the misconceptions and misunderstandings that caused Hitler, in the end, to see only Amerika, not America, and led to his defeat.
    Variant Title
    Hitler and America
    Format
    Book
    Author/Creator
    Fischer, Klaus P., 1942-
    Published
    Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2011
    Locale
    Germany
    United States
    Contents
    Hitler's split image of America
    Hitler takes risks and America legislates itself into neutrality: 1933-1937
    Hitler's year: 1938
    Hitler's war against the west: 1939-1941
    World will hold its breath: 1941
    Tide of war shifts in favor of Hitler's opponents
    Prospects for a separate peace in 1943
    Hitler and the "unnatural alliance": 1944-1945
    This war against America is a tragedy
    Conclusion: Hitler and the end of a greater Reich.
    Notes
    Includes bibliographical references and index.
    Hitler's split image of America -- Hitler takes risks and America legislates itself into neutrality: 1933-1937 -- Hitler's year: 1938 -- Hitler's war against the west: 1939-1941 -- World will hold its breath: 1941 -- Tide of war shifts in favor of Hitler's opponents -- Prospects for a separate peace in 1943 -- Hitler and the "unnatural alliance": 1944-1945 -- This war against America is a tragedy -- Conclusion: Hitler and the end of a greater Reich.

    Physical Details

    Language
    English
    ISBN
    9780812243383
    0812243382 (hardcover : alk. paper)
    Physical Description
    vi, 356 p. ; 24 cm.

    Keywords & Subjects

    Record last modified:
    2013-05-24 16:13:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/bib232143

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