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Clara G. Holocaust testimony (HVT-2460) interviewed by Dana L. Kline and Joanne Weiner Rudof

Oral History | Fortunoff Collection ID: HVT-2460

Videotape testimony of Clara G., who was born in Nyírbátor, Hungary in 1930. She recalls her family's Hasidism; loss of their business in 1943 due to anti-Jewish restrictions; German invasion in March 1944; transfer to the Simapuszta ghetto; train transport from Nyíregyháza to Auschwitz; separation from her parents (she never saw her mother again); remaining with her cousins; briefly seeing her father and brother; lighting candles on Fridays; transfer to Stutthof, then to another camp in summer 1944; slave labor at a munitions factory; camp evacuation; disappearance of the guards; liberation by Soviet troops; and walking to Lublin. Mrs. G. recalls realizing she was an orphan; traveling to Warsaw, Kraków, then Budapest, seeking surviving family; returning home in March 1945; reunion with her brother; learning her father had perished in Dachau four days before liberation; their return to Budapest; traveling to Vienna; assistance from UNRRA and HIAS; living in a displaced persons camp in Ulm, then in an orphanage; and emigration to the United States in April 1948 to join relatives. She discusses the importance to her survival of being with relatives and friends and their continuing close relationships; intentionally repressing memories of her parents in the camps; and reluctance to share her story with her daughters.

Author/Creator
G., Clara, 1930-
Published
Kansas City, Mo. : Midwest Center for Holocaust Education, Inc., 1994
Interview Date
January 11, 1994.
Language
English
Copies
2 copies: 3/4 in. dub; and 1/2 in. VHS with time coding.
Cite As
Clara G. Holocaust Testimony (HVT-2460). Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies, Yale University Library.