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Joseph and Renata S. Holocaust testimony (HVT-583) interviewed by Livia Mallon and Kathy Strochlic

Oral History | Fortunoff Collection ID: HVT-583

Videotape testimony of Joseph S. who was born in Korolevka, Ukraine in 1910 and Renata S. who was born in Lwów, Poland in 1924. Mrs. S. recalls childhood; Soviet occupation; German occupation; round-ups; fleeing to Skala; her father's deportation; meeting her husband; and their marriage. Mr. S. relates his privileged status as the only dentist in Skala; hiding family members with a patient; hiding with his wife in the Borshchov ghetto; a German officer warning them of round-ups; the killing of eight hundred Jews; and the mass grave exploding months later from decaying bodies. Mr. and Mrs. S. discuss the Judenrat; bunkers; the last Aktion when the town was declared Judenrein; smuggling themselves to Hungary; incarceration in Máramarossziget; being freed because Mr. S. had a document from a Hungarian officer he had helped; moving to Budapest; obtaining false Christian papers; moving to a farm; the birth of their son; his baptism; and liberation by the Soviets. They describe moving to Vienna; emigration to the United States; adjustment difficulties; their daughter's birth; sadness and hate when recalling the deaths of so many children; the murder of their son several years ago, about which Mrs. S. wrote a poem; and her teaching about the Holocaust in the school where she works. Mrs. S. emphasizes suddenly feeling human again, upon arriving in Hungary, when she was no longer plagued by constant fear, hunger, lice, and filth.

Author/Creator
S., Joseph, 1910-
Published
New York, N.Y. : Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies at Yale, 1985
Interview Date
May 6, 1985.
Language
English
Copies
3 copies: 3/4 in. master; 3/4 in. dub; and 1/2 in. VHS with time coding.
Cite As
Joseph and Renata S. Holocaust Testimony (HVT-583). Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies, Yale University Library.