Advanced Search

Learn About The Holocaust

Special Collections

My Saved Research

Login

Register

Help

Skip to main content

Oral history interview with Polina Anatol'evna Driuchata, Leonid Mioseevich Neiman, Valentina Vasil'evna, Sasha, and Martin

Oral History | Accession Number: 2009.103.26 | RG Number: RG-50.632.0026

Some video files begin with 10-60 seconds of color bars.

Polina Antonovna Driuchata, born in 1922, describes moving to Tulchin in 1954; her husband, who served in Hungary for four years; returning to Tulchin with their two children in 1960, at which time there were still many Jews in Tulchin; and how many Jews left to live in Germany.
Leonid Moiseevich Neiman, born in 1931, describes moving to Tulchin in 1961; being a widower; living at one time in the village Gorodkovka (Horodkivka) in the Kryzhopol’sky region, where many Jews lived; Jews working as shoemakers, tailors, and tinmen; how after the war there was an artel (corporative association) called “Chervona Zirka”; his father, who was a tradesman; the two synagogues in Gorodkovka, which were later destroyed by the communists; a woman who baked matzo in Gorodkovka; attending a Ukrainian school; speaking Yiddish, but not knowing Hebrew; Jewish wedding traditions; circumcisions; Jewish burial traditions; Jewish holidays; the baker named Makar; a woman named Esther was a shadhan (matchmaker); Isaak the barber, who was with Mr. Neiman in a labor camp; living in Odessa and attending a synagogue on holidays, even under Soviet rule; not being particularly religious, but attending synagogue for the drinks and food; how only very poor Jews lived in Kaptsonivka neighborhood in Tulchin; being at P'iatykhatka camp when he was 11 years old; escaping from the camp and living in the Gorodovka ghetto; his memories of the Ukrainian police; and his two sons.
Valentina Vasili’evna, born in 1941 in Yalta, Ukraine, describes having lived in Tulchin since 1959; being Ukrainian; not knowing anything about Jewish holidays; and her belief that all the Jews have left because of radiation.
Sasha (approximately age 10) describes his grandfather, who was Jewish and in a labor camp when the Germans knocked out his teeth; and his general thoughts about Jews.

Interviewee
Martin
Sasha
Valentina Vasil'evna
Leonid M. Neiman
Polina A. Driuchata
Date
2005 July 20  (interview)
Extent
1 digital file : MP3.
Expand all
 
Record last modified: 2018-04-09 11:38:21
This page: https://collections.ushmm.org/search/catalog/irn85603