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Miklos Roth holds a name card intended to help any of his surviving family members locate him at the Kloster Indersdorf DP camp.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 10592

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    Miklos Roth holds a name card intended to help any of his surviving family members locate him at the Kloster Indersdorf DP camp.
    Miklos Roth holds a name card intended to help any of his surviving family members locate him at the Kloster Indersdorf DP camp.  

This photograph was published in newspapers to facilitate reuniting the family.

    Overview

    Caption
    Miklos Roth holds a name card intended to help any of his surviving family members locate him at the Kloster Indersdorf DP camp.

    This photograph was published in newspapers to facilitate reuniting the family.
    Date
    October 1945 - November 1945
    Locale
    Kloster Indersdorf, [Bavaria; Munich] Germany
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Michael Roth
    Event History
    The Kloster Indersdorf children's center was established by UNRRA to shelter and rehabilitate the thousands of non-German children who were left homeless after the war. With the aid of the American Army, UNRRA Team 182 secured a cloister, Kloster Indersdorf, to serve as a center for these orphaned children. The UNRRA workers were helped in setting up the center by local nuns, who had operated an orphanage at the cloister in the interwar period. Once it was established, Kloster Indersdorf maintained a population of some 350 children, representing over twenty nationalities. Many were children who had been kidnapped by the Nazis from their homes in eastern Europe and brought to the Reich for Aryanization or for forced labor. Many had had their names changed so that they no longer knew their real identities. Some of the older children had even been made to serve in the German home guard [Volkssturm] in the last year of the war. In addition to providing basic care and social rehabilitation for the orphans, the UNRRA team helped to trace the identities of the children and to arrange for their adoption, their return to their homelands, or their emigration to new countries of settlement. The UNRRA team was assisted in providing services by a local order of Catholic nuns. From 1945 until the summer of 1946, Kloster Indersdorf operated as an international children's center, with a Jewish population of between 40-70. Most of the Jewish male youth were concentration camp survivors, particularly from Flossenbuerg. In August 1946 the center became an exclusively Jewish children's home and work kibbutz and remained so until its closing in September 1948.

    [Sources: Fischer, Greta. Oral testimony, USHMM Archives
    Koenigseder, Angelika/ Wetzel, Juliane. Lebensmut im Wartesaal, Fischer Verlag, 1995, p.256.; email by German researcher Anna Andlauer]

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: Michael Roth
    Museum of Jewish Heritage/Center For Holocaust Studies
    Copyright: Exclusively with source
    Provenance: Robert Marx
    Source Record ID: 1581 A514

    Keywords & Subjects

    Administrative Notes

    Biography
    Miklos Roth, later known as Michael, came from a family of Hungarian Jews. His older brother, Sandor, escaped to Palestine prior to the Nazi takeover of Hungary. His mother, Regina (née Weinberger), his sister, Ibolya, and brothers Tibor and Imre were murdered upon arrival at Auschwitz in 1944. His father, Meynhart, died on a death march in March or April 1945. In May 1946, Miklos emigrated to the United States to live with his Aunt Freida. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps and graduated from college. He spent many years in retail management and then worked in real estate. He kept in touch with several of the boys he met while he was at Kloster Indersdorf. He attended a reunion of Kloster Indersdorf children and appeared in a documentary about them. Michael Roth passed away on February 24, 2011. His relatives remember him as generous, warm-hearted, self-reliant, and resilient.

    [Source: USHMM's Online "Remember Me" Project sponsored by the Holocaust Survivors and Victims Resource Center, 2011.]

    Miklos (later Michael) Roth is the son of Menyhert Roth and Regina Weinberger Roth. He was born on March 29, 1931 in Ricse, Hungary where his father was a sexton. He had three siblings: Sandor, Tibor and Imre. Following the German invasion of Hungary in March 1944, he was taken to a ghetto in Satoralya. The following month he was deported to Auschwitz. His mother and two younger brothers, Tibor and Imre, were killed upon arrival. Miklos and his father stayed in Auschwitz briefly and then were sent to Kitlitztreben. They stayed there until February 1945 and then were marched to Buchenwald and Flossenbuerg. Menyhert was shot and killed on April 7 after he fell down while marching. Miklos continued on alone. Of 1500 prisoners who began the death march, Miklos was one of only 170 still alive when the prisoners arrived in Flossenbuerg on April 17. One week later, on April 23, 1945, the US army liberated Miklos at the age of 14. Miklos, who was extremely ill upon his liberation, was nursed back to health at a makeshift US army hospital. After his recuperation, Miklos went to the Kloster Indersdorf children's home and stayed there from August 1945 until May 1946. In May he came to the United States on board the Marine Flasher, sailing out of Bremerhaven Germany, to live with an aunt in the Bronx who had arrived in 1936. Of Miklos' immediate family, only Sandor, who had gone to Palestine, survived.
    Record last modified:
    2020-06-09 00:00:00
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