Advanced Search

Learn About The Holocaust

Special Collections

My Saved Research

Login

Register

Help

Skip to main content

A letter sent by the personal service bureau of the American Joint Distribution Committee to Mendel Rozenblit, informing him that a woman in Melbourne is looking for a survivor by the same name and asking if he is that person.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 05841

Search this record's additional resources, such as finding aids, documents, or transcripts.

No results match this search term.
Check spelling and try again.

results are loading

0 results found for “keyward

    A letter sent by the personal service bureau of the American Joint Distribution Committee to Mendel Rozenblit, informing him that a woman in Melbourne is looking for a survivor by the same name and asking if he is that person.
    A letter sent by the personal service bureau of the American Joint Distribution Committee to Mendel Rozenblit, informing him that a woman in Melbourne is looking for a survivor by the same name and asking if he is that person.

    Overview

    Caption
    A letter sent by the personal service bureau of the American Joint Distribution Committee to Mendel Rozenblit, informing him that a woman in Melbourne is looking for a survivor by the same name and asking if he is that person.
    Date
    1946 November 01
    Locale
    Munich, [Bavaria] Germany
    Variant Locale
    Muenchen
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Marsha Rozenblit

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: Marsha Rozenblit

    Keywords & Subjects

    Administrative Notes

    Biography
    Mendel Rozenblit (the donor's father) was born in Lukow, Poland on November 13, 1907. He was the son of Abram Icek and Masza (Markusfeld) Rozenblit, who owned a general store in the town. Mendel had five siblings: Nehama, Shia, Simcha, Haim Yaakov, and Meir. In 1929 Mendel married and moved to Wolomin near Warsaw. The following year, his wife gave birth to a son Avraham. Soon after, however, Mira died, and Mendel married her sister Perele. A second child, Tova, was born to him in 1934. During the Nazi occupation Mendel lived in the Wolomin ghetto until it was liquidated and he was deported to Auschwitz. He spent eighteen months in the concentration camp before his evacuation in January 1945 on one of the death marches to Germany. The remaining months of the war were spent in Dachau, where he was liberated by American troops in April 1945. With the exception of his father who died in 1919, and his brother Haim, who died in Palestine in 1943, Mendel's entire family was killed by the Nazis. During the first two years after the liberation, Mendel lived independently in an apartment in Munich. Though he was urged by relatives to settle in Palestine and he explored the possibility of emigrating to Australia, Mendel opted to go to the U.S. when his visa was granted. He sailed aboard the Marine Flasher from Bremerhaven on November 27, 1947.
    Record last modified:
    2000-06-28 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1072356

    Download & Licensing

    In-Person Research

    Contact Us