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Postcard written by Dodi Anker to her friend, Ille Baum, in Palestine, showing the ship on which the Anker sisters sailed to safety in England.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 21140

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    Postcard written by Dodi Anker to her friend, Ille Baum, in Palestine, showing the ship on which the Anker sisters sailed to safety in England.
    Postcard written by Dodi Anker to her friend, Ille Baum, in Palestine, showing the ship on which the Anker sisters sailed to safety in England.

    Overview

    Caption
    Postcard written by Dodi Anker to her friend, Ille Baum, in Palestine, showing the ship on which the Anker sisters sailed to safety in England.
    Date
    June 1939
    Locale
    Rotterdam, [South Holland] The Netherlands?
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of George Fogelson
    Event History
    Between December 1938 and September 1939, close to 10,000 unaccompanied refugee children from central Europe were permitted entry into Great Britain. They arrived in a series of transports which came to be known as the Kindertransports. The first group, which arrived in Harwich via the Hook of Holland on December 2, 1938, consisted of 200 children between the ages of 12 and 17 from Berlin and Hamburg. The second group, which arrived December 12, consisted of 502 children from Vienna. The third group, which arrived December 15, consisted of 370 children from northern Germany, especially Hamburg and Berlin. Seventy percent of the children were Jewish and were chosen by the central Jewish organizations in Germany, Austria, and Czechoslovakia. An additional 500 children were brought in as members of Youth Aliyah groups, and 1,350 arrived as agricultural trainees. The children were divided into two categories: those guaranteed by private sponsors and those under the auspices of the Refugee Children's Movement (RCM). In addition to the RCM and its local committees, several Jewish organizations assisted the refugee children. Upon their arrival in Britain, the children were housed in temporary reception camps, such as the Dovercourt Bay, Pakefield, and Broadstairs holiday camps. After a few weeks they were taken to foster homes or hostels throughout the country. Others lived on agricultural training farms set up by the Youth Aliyah organization in Britain.

    https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/article/kindertransport-1938-1940.

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: George Fogelson
    Source Record ID: Collections: 2003.353

    Keywords & Subjects

    Administrative Notes

    Biography
    Hilde (Anker) Fogelson (the mother of George Fogelson), was the daughter of Georg and Gertrud (Gottschalk) Anker. Hilde was born on May 29, 1926 in Berlin. She had two older sisters, Eva (b. 1922) and Dodi (b. 1924). Hilde's paternal grandfather, Simon Anker (d.1935), was a wealthy grain merchant in Danzig and the head of a household of twelve children. He was a prominent member of the local Jewish community, who served as president of the main synagogue and patron of the Bar Kochba sports club. He donated his villa to the sports club which became known as Ankerhaus. Hilde's father, Georg, left Danzig in 1921 and settled in Berlin, where he ran a men's clothing business. On May 15, 1921 he married Gertrud Gottschalk, the daughter of Hugo and Bertha (Wolfberg) Gottschalk from Schlawe (Pomerania). Hugo owned the town's grain mill, which had been in the family since 1873. Gertrud had three older siblings, Nanny (Gottschalk) Lewin (b. 1888), Bruno (who died prematurely in 1911) and Kaethe (Gottschalk) Knipfer (b. 1892). Hugo died before the war on July 31, 1934. After his death Bertha and Nanny moved to Berlin hoping that in the city they would be less conspicuous targets for anti-Semites. They moved downstairs from Kaethe, who had married a German Protestant and converted in 1911. Bertha had an opportunity to come to America in 1941, but she refused to leave without Nanny. In 1942 Bertha and Nanny were deported to Theresienstadt, where Bertha perished on November 23, 1942. Nanny was deported to Auschwitz on May 15, 1944 and killed immediately. Her daughter Ursula was also killed in Auschwitz after having been deported from Berlin on March 12, 1943. Despite her conversion to Christianity, Kaethe was deported to Theresienstadt in 1944. She survived the war. Gertrud and Georg sent their three daughters, Eva, Dodi and Hilde, to England with a Kindertransport that arrived on June 14, 1939. On July 13, 1939 Georg and Gertrud flew to Copenhagen, where they stayed briefly before joining their daughters in England. In October 1940 the Anker family sailed to the United States aboard the SS Nova Scotia. The family settled in Van Nuys, California, where Georg established a chicken farm.
    Record last modified:
    2005-06-07 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1081013

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