Advanced Search

Learn About The Holocaust

Special Collections

My Saved Research

Login

Register

Help

Skip to main content

Two young Jewish children sit outside their home in Moenchengladbach, Germany.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 31815

Search this record's additional resources, such as finding aids, documents, or transcripts.

No results match this search term.
Check spelling and try again.

results are loading

0 results found for “keyward

    Two young Jewish children sit outside their home in Moenchengladbach, Germany.
    Two young Jewish children sit outside their home in Moenchengladbach, Germany.

Pictured are members of the Hermanns family.

    Overview

    Caption
    Two young Jewish children sit outside their home in Moenchengladbach, Germany.

    Pictured are members of the Hermanns family.
    Date
    Before 1939
    Locale
    Moenchengladbach, [Prussian Rhineland; North Rhine-Westphalia] Germany
    Variant Locale
    Rheydt
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Kurt & Jill Berg Pauly

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: Kurt & Jill Berg Pauly
    Source Record ID: Collections: 1497.12.45

    Keywords & Subjects

    Administrative Notes

    Artifact Photographer
    Max Reid
    Biography
    Julius Hermanns was a Jewish textile merchant in Moenchengladbach, Germany. He was arrested in September 1939, deported to Dachau and then transferred to Buchenwald. In mid-April 1939, having agreed to emigrate immediately, he was released. His brother-in-law in New York arranged the purchase of a Cuban landing certificate for him, and Julius booked passage on the St. Louis. He was unable to pay, however, for additional tickets for his wife, Grete, and teenage daughter, Hilde, so they remained in Germany. When the St. Louis was forced to return to Europe, Julius was given refuge in France, where he hoped his wife and daughter could join him. When France declared war on Germany, Julius was arrested as an enemy alien and later evacuated to the south of France. He was sent to Saint Cyprien, an internment camp near the Spanish border, where he was detained with some 50 other St. Louis passengers. After transfers to the Gurs and Les Milles internment camps, Julius was sent with 235 other prisoners to the Drancy transit camp in Paris on August 11, 1942. Three days later, he was deported to his death in Auschwitz. His wife, daughter, and other relatives were deported to the Riga ghetto on December 11, 1941, where they were probably killed.
    Record last modified:
    2004-08-10 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1110615

    Download & Licensing

    In-Person Research

    Contact Us