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Portrait of Helene and Moritz Schoenberger taken around the time of their marriage.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 32628

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    Portrait of Helene and Moritz Schoenberger taken around the time of their marriage.
    Portrait of Helene and Moritz Schoenberger taken around the time of their marriage.

    Overview

    Caption
    Portrait of Helene and Moritz Schoenberger taken around the time of their marriage.
    Date
    1910 - 1920
    Locale
    Germany?
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Julie Klein

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: Julie Klein
    Source Record ID: Collections: 1988.108.162

    Keywords & Subjects

    Administrative Notes

    Biography
    Moritz Schoenberger, the donor's grandfather, was born in Sarvar, Hungary on October 30, 1887. In his youth he moved to Vienna, where he became a commercial artist and vendor of window decorations. Moritz married Helene Rosenthal of Frankfurt am Main and had one child, Bianka. In March 1939, one year after the annexation of Austria, Helen and Bianka left Vienna for the United States aboard the SS Hansa. Moritz planned to follow them a short time later and booked passage on the MS St. Louis. At the conclusion of the ill-fated voyage, Moritz disembarked in Belgium. From there, he made his way to France, where he was later arrested and interned in a series of camps, including Gurs, Les Milles and St. Cyprien. In the meantime, from her new home in the U.S., Moritz' wife, Helene, petitioned American authorities to secure immigration papers for him. The U.S. State Department finally approved his visa in November 1941. However, it took another eleven months before Moritz could acquire an exit visa from the Vichy government and leave the country. From Marseilles he made his way to Lisbon, where he sailed for the United States.
    Record last modified:
    2015-04-28 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1111866

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