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Studio portrait of the Senenseib family, all of whom later perished in Auschwitz.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 32053

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    Studio portrait of the Senenseib family, all of whom later perished in Auschwitz.
    Studio portrait of the Senenseib family, all of whom later perished in Auschwitz.

Pictured from left to right are: Regina Rosenheck Senenseib, Clarzia Senenseib, Mundic Senenseib, Fridka Senenseib, and Abraham Senenseib.  The Senenseib family were relatives of the donor, Frieda Brender.

    Overview

    Caption
    Studio portrait of the Senenseib family, all of whom later perished in Auschwitz.

    Pictured from left to right are: Regina Rosenheck Senenseib, Clarzia Senenseib, Mundic Senenseib, Fridka Senenseib, and Abraham Senenseib. The Senenseib family were relatives of the donor, Frieda Brender.
    Date
    1927 - 1928
    Locale
    Kolomyja, [Ukraine; Stanislawow] Poland
    Variant Locale
    Kolomea
    Kolomyya
    Ukraine
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Fritzi Brender Schiffer

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: Fritzi Brender Schiffer

    Keywords & Subjects

    Administrative Notes

    Biography
    Frieda (Fritzi) Brender was the only daughter of Jacob and Anna (Rosenheck) Brender. She was born May 10, 1922 in Sadagura, Romania, where her father was a jeweler and watchmaker. Raised in a modern orthodox household, Fritizi attended the Bet Yaakov school in Sadagura, the Balan Girls' Gymnasium in Cernauti and belonged to the Maccabi Jewish sports organization. In June 1940, Cernauti came under Soviet control and many local businesses were confiscated. In May 1941 Fritzi married Chaim Weissman. When the Germans entered Cernauti a few weeks later, Fritzi and Chaim fled to Vinnitsa on July 1, 1941. They then continued on foot to Rostov-on-Don where they worked on a kolkhoz (collective farm) in nearby Taganrog. As the front continued to approach, they journeyed farther east to Tashkent and Samarkand. In Samarkand, Fritzi worked in a military parts factory. Chaim became ill and died in a hospital there. After his death, Fritzi stayed and worked in the hospital, where she met Mr. Trigub, a Ukrainian Jew in charge of food distribution. Fritzi next went to work for Mr. Trigub caring for his sick wife and child until the summer of 1944. After the liberation of Cernauti, she returned home to learn that her parents had died in Copaigorod, Transnistria. As "essential" personnel, they had been given permission to remain in Cernauti but elected to go to Transnistria in search of Fritzi. In 1946, Fritzi married her second husband, Adolph Schiffer.
    Record last modified:
    2014-05-16 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1112009

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