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Members of the Kibbutz Buchenwald hachshara are gathered outside their barracks, beneath a banner bearing their name in Hebrew.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 32090

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    Members of the Kibbutz Buchenwald hachshara are gathered outside their barracks, beneath a banner bearing their name in Hebrew.
    Members of the Kibbutz Buchenwald hachshara are gathered outside their barracks, beneath a banner bearing their name in Hebrew.

    Overview

    Caption
    Members of the Kibbutz Buchenwald hachshara are gathered outside their barracks, beneath a banner bearing their name in Hebrew.
    Date
    1945
    Locale
    Geringshof, [Fulda] Germany
    Variant Locale
    Kibbutz Buchenwald
    Israel
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Eva Tuchsznajder Lang
    Event History
    Kibbutz Buchenwald was founded in June 1945 by survivors of the Buchenwald concentration camp with the support of American army chaplain, Rabbi Herschel Schacter. However, the idea of creating a post-war socialist Zionist collective was hatched by a small group ofr men including Arthur Poznansky, Yechezkel Tydor and Eliyahu Gruenbaum and three Gottlieb brothers while they were still in concentration camp. Schacter helped requisition a farm in Eggendorf complete with animals and equipment, and the first sixteen members took possession on June 3. Kibbutz Buchenwald as founded on principles of tolerance and welcomed members from across the political spectrum. In July the Kibbutz moved to Geringshof, the site of a previous Jewish agricultural school founded in 1923 that managed to stay open until 1941 before its Jewish students were deported. At the war's end, the American military government recovered the farm and permitted it to be reopened for Jewish youth once more. Many of the group immigrated to Palestine aboard the Tel Chai refugee ship in 1946. At first absorbed by Kibbutz Afikim, the members of Kibbutz Buchenwald later split off to found a new kibbutz, Netzer Sereni. The last members of Kibbutz Buchenwald emigrated in 1949.

    [Source: Baumel, Judith Tydor. "Kibbutz Buchenwald and Kibbutz Hafetz Hayyim: Two Experiments in the Rehabilitation of Jewish Survivors in Germany", Holocaust and Genocide Studies, V9, N2, Fall 1995.]

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: Eva Tuchsznajder Lang
    Museum of Jewish Heritage/Center For Holocaust Studies
    Copyright: Exclusively with source
    Provenance: Rabbi Herschel Schachter
    Source Record ID: 6 A 6.12

    Keywords & Subjects

    Record last modified:
    2004-03-30 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1112184

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