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Group portrait of young Jewish men and women posing on a wooden structure in the Zelow ghetto.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 97198

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    Group portrait of young Jewish men and women posing on a wooden structure in the Zelow ghetto.
    Group portrait of young Jewish men and women posing on a wooden structure in the Zelow ghetto.

Among those pictured is Moryc Brajtbard (second from the left).

    Overview

    Caption
    Group portrait of young Jewish men and women posing on a wooden structure in the Zelow ghetto.

    Among those pictured is Moryc Brajtbard (second from the left).
    Date
    1940 June 13
    Locale
    Zelow, [Lodz] Poland
    Variant Locale
    Zelav
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Lucy Gliklich Breitbart

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: Lucy Gliklich Breitbart

    Keywords & Subjects

    Photo Designation
    GHETTOS (MINOR) -- (Z)

    Administrative Notes

    Biography
    Morris Breitbart (born Moryc Brajtbart) is the son of Samuel and Kreindel (Piotrkowska) Brajtbart. He was born December 25, 1921 in Szczercow, Poland. Moryc had two sisters: Rosa and Bronia. When the Germans invaded Poland in September 1939, Szczercow was largely destroyed and the Brajtbarts relocated to Zelow. In 1941 the family was forcibly resettled to the Lodz ghetto. Subsequently, the Brajtbarts were placed on a deportation transport. Moryc managed to escape from the train with his uncle and two cousins and flee into the woods. Reaching the home of a local farmer, with whom his uncle was acquainted, Moryc stood guard outside while his uncle and cousins entered the house to ask for assistance. When Moryc happened to look through the window to see what was happening, he saw the bodies of his uncle and cousins lying on the floor. Moryc then fled to another farm in a nearby village. There, an elderly peasant woman by the name of Genia agreed to hide him. Moryc was hidden first in the attic and then in a hole beneath the stable until his liberation. After the war, Moryc made his way to Germany, where he met his future wife, Lucy Gliklich, and attended dental school in Munich. The couple married in the Rosenheim displaced persons camp on March 22, 1949 and immigrated to the United States the following December.
    Record last modified:
    2020-06-23 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1118244

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