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False papers issued to Abe Lajbman under the assumed name Franz Joseph Dupont.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 99709

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    False papers issued to Abe Lajbman under the assumed name Franz Joseph Dupont.
    False papers issued to Abe Lajbman under the assumed name Franz Joseph Dupont.

    Overview

    Caption
    False papers issued to Abe Lajbman under the assumed name Franz Joseph Dupont.
    Date
    1942 - 1944
    Locale
    Brussels, [Brabant] Belgium
    Variant Locale
    Brussel
    Bruxelles
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Jacques Leibman

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: Jacques Leibman

    Keywords & Subjects

    Photo Designation
    RESCUERS & RESCUED -- Belgium

    Administrative Notes

    Biography
    Jacques Leibman (born Isaac Lajbman) is the son of Abraham and Chaja Sura (Radziejewski) Lajbman, a Jewish couple from Poland who had moved to Belgium in the interwar period. Isaac was born on June 22, 1931 in Brussels, where his father worked as a leather goods manufacturer. He has two brothers: Bernard (b. 1938) and Raymond (b. 1946). The Lajbman family remained in Brussels after the German invasion. In the spring of 1942 Isaac's parents secured false papers for themselves and found hiding places for the children. Isaac and Bernard were first hidden in Wilrijk (near Antwerp) and then in Marcinelle (near Charleroi). In both places food and sanitation were very poor, so in September 1942 they were moved to the village of Tourinnes-St. Lambert. There they lived with two separate families: Isaac with Alphonse and Marie Quintin, and Bernard with the Ravet family. Both families treated the children as one of their own until the liberation. Isaac's mother, who paid for their upkeep, was able to visit them once a month. After the war the Lajbman family was reunited and moved to Ixelles, where they remained until immigrating to the United States in 1953-54.
    Record last modified:
    2001-03-06 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1124729

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