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Red Cross letter sent by a German Jewish refugee couple in amsterdam to their grand nephews in Manchester, England.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 38541

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    Red Cross letter sent by a German Jewish refugee couple in amsterdam to their grand nephews in Manchester, England.
    Red Cross letter sent by a German Jewish refugee couple in amsterdam to their grand nephews in Manchester, England.

The letter was written by Hermann and Lina Kleeblatt to Hans and Oskar Levy. The text reads, "How are you?  We await news from you.  Your parents wrote that they are fine as is Elsbeth.  Uncle Hermann and Aunt Lina".

Hermann and Lina Kleeblatt are the great uncle and aunt of Hans and Oskar Levy.  Elsbeth is the older sister of the boys.  The Kleeblatts were arrested in Amsterdam in 1943 and deported to the East.  Hermann died in Bergen-Belsen on January 2, 1945.

    Overview

    Caption
    Red Cross letter sent by a German Jewish refugee couple in amsterdam to their grand nephews in Manchester, England.

    The letter was written by Hermann and Lina Kleeblatt to Hans and Oskar Levy. The text reads, "How are you? We await news from you. Your parents wrote that they are fine as is Elsbeth. Uncle Hermann and Aunt Lina".

    Hermann and Lina Kleeblatt are the great uncle and aunt of Hans and Oskar Levy. Elsbeth is the older sister of the boys. The Kleeblatts were arrested in Amsterdam in 1943 and deported to the East. Hermann died in Bergen-Belsen on January 2, 1945.
    Date
    1943 July 24
    Locale
    Amsterdam, [North Holland] The Netherlands
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Hans Levy

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: Hans Levy

    Keywords & Subjects

    Administrative Notes

    Biography
    Hans Robert Levy is the son of Salomon (Sally) and Helene (Weinberg) Levy. He was born on February 2, 1927, in Gladbeck, Germany, where his parents owned a grocery store. His older sister, Elsbeth, was born in 1925, and his younger brother, Oskar, was born in 1928. During the Nazi boycott of Jewish businesses on April 1, 1933, the family store was vandalized. Soon after, the Levys sold the business and moved to Hamm, where Sally started a job as a travelling wine salesman. Hans and his siblings attended the local school, where they were tormented for being Jews. Five years later the family moved to Herzebrock, where they lived with relatives. During the Kristallnacht pogrom of November 9, 1938, their house was ransacked and Hans' uncle was beaten. Immediately afterwards Hans' father and uncle fled to the home of another relative in Dortmund, returning only in mid-December. The Levys then registered their children for Kindertransports to Holland. Elsbeth, who was thirteen at the time, left on January 12, 1939; Hans and Oskar left one week later. The boys were moved several times before arriving in Amsterdam in the fall of 1939. Elsbeth stayed in Dribergen initially, but later moved in with German refugee relatives living in Amsterdam. On February 17, 1940 all three siblings were present for Hans' Bar Mitzvah celebration. On May 14, four days after the invasion of Holland, Hans and Oskar sailed for England on the SS Bodgraven with sixty other Jewish refugee children. A few days after their arrival in Liverpool, they were taken to Manchester, where for the next eight years they resided in a hostel while attending school and working. Soon after their children left Germany, Sally and Helena moved to Dortmund, where they were arrested in July 1942 and deported to Theresienstadt. Elsbeth, who was stranded in Amsterdam after the German invasion, also arrested in 1942 and sent to Theresienstadt, where she met up with her parents. Subsequently, she was transferred to an ammunitions factory labor camp. From there, Elsbeth was deported to Auschwitz, where she learned that her parents had arrived on October 17, 1943 and had been killed immediately. Elsbeth survived the war, and soon after the liberation returned to Holland to marry her fiancé, Fred Kaufman, whom she had met in Theresienstadt. After a brief search she located her brothers in England and arranged a reunion. Elsbeth and her husband immigrated to the United States, while Hans and Oskar remained in England.
    Record last modified:
    2004-07-19 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1127043

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