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A studio portrait of Anita Kuenstler taken while she was in hiding at the age of two. She poses in a hat while also wearing a chain with a cross around her neck.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 58196

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    A studio portrait of Anita Kuenstler taken while she was in hiding at the age of two. She poses in a hat while also wearing a chain with a cross around her neck.
    A studio portrait of Anita Kuenstler taken while she was in hiding at the age of two.  She poses in a hat while also wearing a chain with a cross around her neck.

    Overview

    Caption
    A studio portrait of Anita Kuenstler taken while she was in hiding at the age of two. She poses in a hat while also wearing a chain with a cross around her neck.
    Date
    1942
    Locale
    Krakow, [Krakow] Poland
    Variant Locale
    Krakau
    Cracow
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Anita Kuenstler Epstein

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: Anita Kuenstler Epstein
    Source Record ID: Collections: 2001.321

    Keywords & Subjects

    Photo Designation
    RESCUERS & RESCUED -- Poland

    Administrative Notes

    Artifact Photographer
    Max Reid
    Biography
    Anita Epstein (born Anita Kuentsler) is the daughter of Salek and Eda Kuenstler. Her parents married in Krakow on August 30, 1939. Anita was born on November 18, 1942 in the Krakow ghetto. When she was three months old, her parents spirited her out of the ghetto, persuading a Catholic family named Zendler to hide her. The Zendlers, who had three children of their own, baptized Anita and raised her as a Catholic. Salek was killed in Mauthausen, but Eda survived two labor camps and incarceration in Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen from which she was liberated in April 1945. After hospital treatment for typhus she returned to Krakow and found Anita. Eda and Anita went with other Jews to a displaced persons' camp in Selb, Germany near the Czechoslovakian border. They lived in Selb until 1949 and then came to the United States on a troop ship, the USS Taylor.
    Record last modified:
    2014-04-16 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1143805

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