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Police permit issued by the police president of Berlin on April 8, 1944 allowing a Jewish man, Harry Israel Kastan (b. March 20, 1891), to travel between two sections of Berlin from April 8-10, 1944.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 62598

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    Police permit issued by the police president of Berlin on April 8, 1944 allowing a Jewish man, Harry Israel Kastan (b. March 20, 1891), to travel between two sections of Berlin from April 8-10, 1944.
    Police permit issued by the police president of Berlin on April 8, 1944 allowing a Jewish man, Harry Israel Kastan (b. March 20, 1891), to travel between two sections of Berlin from April 8-10, 1944.

    Overview

    Caption
    Police permit issued by the police president of Berlin on April 8, 1944 allowing a Jewish man, Harry Israel Kastan (b. March 20, 1891), to travel between two sections of Berlin from April 8-10, 1944.
    Date
    1944 April 08
    Locale
    Berlin, [Berlin] Germany
    Variant Locale
    Berlin-Buckow
    Berlin-Mariendorf
    Berlin-Ploetzensee
    Berlin-Reinickendorf
    Berlin-Tempelhof
    Berlin-Wannsee
    Berlin-Schlachtensee
    Berlin-Duppel
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Hannah Kastan Weiss

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: Hannah Kastan Weiss
    Source Record ID: Collections: 1996.23.78

    Keywords & Subjects

    Administrative Notes

    Biography
    Hannah Weiss (born Hannah Kastan) is the daughter of Guenter and Sara Kastan. She was born November 23, 1938 in Berlin. Her mother and father were Jewish, her paternal grandfather was Jewish and her paternal grandmother was not. During World War II her parents were pressed into forced labor at the Siemens plant in Berlin, where they remained until March 1943. Hannah spent weekends with her parents but lived with her grandparents in Berlin during the week. In March 1943 Hannah was rounded-up with her parents and taken to the deportation assembly center at the Berlin Jewish Home for the Aged. Hannah's grandmother spotted her there and managed to smuggle her out. For the next two years Hannah lived with her grandparents, who registered her as their own child. She had to remain indoors and hide whenever there was a knock on the door, but otherwise led a normal life. Hannah's mother was never heard from again after her deportation and is presumed to have perished in Auschwitz. Her father continued to send mail to his parents and daughter until January 1945. He was assigned to forced labor in the Buna factory in Auschwitz III (Monowitz). Guenter was reportedly beaten and then shot to death by an SS guard on February 28, 1945, during the death march from Auschwitz to Germany.
    Record last modified:
    2004-04-02 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1146554

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