Advanced Search

Learn About The Holocaust

Special Collections

My Saved Research

Login

Register

Help

Skip to main content

Members of the Betar Zionist movement stand at attention in an outdoor meeting in Shanghai.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 62840

Search this record's additional resources, such as finding aids, documents, or transcripts.

No results match this search term.
Check spelling and try again.

results are loading

0 results found for “keyward

    Members of the Betar Zionist movement stand at attention in an outdoor meeting in Shanghai.
    Members of the Betar Zionist movement stand at attention in an outdoor meeting in Shanghai.

    Overview

    Caption
    Members of the Betar Zionist movement stand at attention in an outdoor meeting in Shanghai.
    Date
    1941 - 1948
    Locale
    Shanghai, [Kiangsu] China
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Gary Matzdorff

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: Gary Matzdorff

    Keywords & Subjects

    Administrative Notes

    Biography
    Guenther (now Gary) Matzdorff is the son of Herbert (b. 6/16/1893) and Edith Rothe Matzdorff (b. 4/3/1899). Guenther was born on July 10, 1921 in Berlin Germany where his father was a fur wholesaler. The family identified as liberal Jews and belonged to the Juedische Gemeinde in Berlin. From 1933 to 1936 Guenther attended the Jewish boys' school on Grosse Hamburger Strasse. Afterwards, he worked as an apprentice leather goods maker for the Jewish company, Robert Hartman and Neuhahn. During the Kristallnacht pogrom in November 1938, Guenther and his father escaped arrest by riding subways the entire night while his mother and grandmother stayed home. They then hid for two weeks with a Hungarian Christian customer of Herbert until they thought it was safe to return home. In April 1939 after obtaining the necessary exit visas, the family went to Genoa, Italy and boarded the S.S. Victoria for Shanghai. Before 1941 Guenther worked for a brokerage firm, but after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor he spent the rest of the war performing odd jobs such as helping in a bakery and delivering coal. Guenther also belonged to the boy scouts and the Zionist Betar group. He married in March 1947 in Shanghai and immigrated the following year to the United States.
    Record last modified:
    2004-04-30 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1146785

    Download & Licensing

    In-Person Research

    Contact Us