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Group pictured of German Jewish children in a summer camp in Bad Sassendorf.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 62986

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    Group pictured of German Jewish children in a summer camp in Bad Sassendorf.
    Group pictured of German Jewish children in a summer camp in Bad Sassendorf.

Gerd Zwienicki is in the center of the front row.

    Overview

    Caption
    Group pictured of German Jewish children in a summer camp in Bad Sassendorf.

    Gerd Zwienicki is in the center of the front row.
    Date
    July 1926
    Locale
    Bad Sassendorf, [Prussian Westphalia; North Rhine-Westphalia] Germany
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Jacob G. Wiener

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: Jacob G. Wiener

    Keywords & Subjects

    Administrative Notes

    Biography
    Jacob Wiener (born Gerd Zwienicki) is the son of Selma Stiefel and Josef Zwienicki. He was born in 1917 in Bremen, where his family owned a bicycle shop. Gerd had three siblings: a brother Benno (b. 1918), a sister Liesel (b. 1921), and a brother Alfred (b. 1925). Gerd left home in 1936 to study at the Breuer yeshiva in Frankfurt. A year later he began his studies at the Wuerzburg Jewish teachers seminary. On the night of Kristallnacht the students of the rabbinical seminary, including Gerd, were arrested and placed in protective custody, where they remained for eight days. Meanwhile, Gerd's family was facing tragedy in Bremen. His father was sufficiently aware of the threat posed by the Nazis that he fled from his home during the pogrom. However, he did not anticipate what they might do to his family in his absence. That night when members of the SA came looking for him at his home and failed to find him, they shot and killed his wife and arrested his son, Benno, who was then sent to Sachsenhausen. Following Benno's release, the family departed for Canada, leaving Germany on May 31, 1939.
    Record last modified:
    2004-09-08 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1146945

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