Advanced Search

Learn About The Holocaust

Special Collections

My Saved Research

Login

Register

Help

Skip to main content

Queen Wilhelmina places the red, white and blue bouquet she is wearing on the exact spot where four Dutch patriots were executed by the Germans for an attempt to prevent the blasting of a vital lock gate.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 51151

Search this record's additional resources, such as finding aids, documents, or transcripts.

No results match this search term.
Check spelling and try again.

results are loading

0 results found for “keyward

    Queen Wilhelmina places the red, white and blue bouquet she is wearing on the exact spot where four Dutch patriots were executed by the Germans for an attempt to prevent the blasting of a vital lock gate.
    Queen Wilhelmina places the red, white and blue bouquet she is wearing on the exact spot where four Dutch patriots were executed by the Germans for an attempt to prevent the blasting of a vital lock gate. 

The ceremony, honoring the heroes of Terneuzen, was entirely impromptu.

Original Caption: "In her first visit to her country after five years of exile, Queen Wilhelmina cisted every town, every village and every hamlet that she could fit into a 10-day tour of liberated areas in Hlooand. The 65-year-old Queen did not spare herself. She saw the vast stretches of inundated countryside, which will remain barren for years to come even after the bombed dikes of The Netherlands are repaired. She saw the depris of towns where fighting took place only a few days before her visit, gave sympathy and solace to men, woman and children who were wounded or bereaved. She met the valiant miners of Hoerlan and Venlo. Wherever she stopped, she talked with the men and women wo fought stubbornly and silently in the Dutch Resistance Movement. It was announced March 23, 1945, that the unofficial, unplanned tour had ended with queen Wilhelmina's return to England. The queen was born in the Hague in 1880 and has reigned on the Dutch throne since 1890. When the Germans invaded Holland in May, 1940, Queen Wilhelmina was forced to flee to England."

    Overview

    Caption
    Queen Wilhelmina places the red, white and blue bouquet she is wearing on the exact spot where four Dutch patriots were executed by the Germans for an attempt to prevent the blasting of a vital lock gate.

    The ceremony, honoring the heroes of Terneuzen, was entirely impromptu.

    Original Caption: "In her first visit to her country after five years of exile, Queen Wilhelmina cisted every town, every village and every hamlet that she could fit into a 10-day tour of liberated areas in Hlooand. The 65-year-old Queen did not spare herself. She saw the vast stretches of inundated countryside, which will remain barren for years to come even after the bombed dikes of The Netherlands are repaired. She saw the depris of towns where fighting took place only a few days before her visit, gave sympathy and solace to men, woman and children who were wounded or bereaved. She met the valiant miners of Hoerlan and Venlo. Wherever she stopped, she talked with the men and women wo fought stubbornly and silently in the Dutch Resistance Movement. It was announced March 23, 1945, that the unofficial, unplanned tour had ended with queen Wilhelmina's return to England. The queen was born in the Hague in 1880 and has reigned on the Dutch throne since 1890. When the Germans invaded Holland in May, 1940, Queen Wilhelmina was forced to flee to England."
    Date
    March 1945
    Locale
    Terneuzen, [Zeeland] The Netherlands
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Joseph Eaton

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: Joseph Eaton

    Keywords & Subjects

    Photo Designation
    LIBERATION -- The Netherlands
    Record last modified:
    2011-02-24 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1173610

    Download & Licensing

    In-Person Research

    Contact Us