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Women in the barracks of the newly liberated Auschwitz concentration camp.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 31450B

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    Women in the barracks of the newly liberated Auschwitz concentration camp.
    Women in the barracks of the newly liberated Auschwitz concentration camp.

Pictured on the far left, wearing a scarf, is Rivka Ruchle Chencinska (nee Krause).

STILL PHOTOGRAPH FROM THE SOVIET FILM of the liberation of Auschwitz, taken by the film unit of the First Ukrainian Front.

    Overview

    Caption
    Women in the barracks of the newly liberated Auschwitz concentration camp.

    Pictured on the far left, wearing a scarf, is Rivka Ruchle Chencinska (nee Krause).

    STILL PHOTOGRAPH FROM THE SOVIET FILM of the liberation of Auschwitz, taken by the film unit of the First Ukrainian Front.
    Date
    After 1945 January 27
    Locale
    Auschwitz, [Upper Silesia] Poland
    Variant Locale
    Brzezinka
    Birkenau
    Auschwitz III
    Monowitz
    Auschwitz II
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration, College Park
    Event History
    The Soviet film about the liberation of Auschwitz was shot over a period of several months beginning on January 27, 1945, the day of liberation. It consists of both staged and unrehearsed footage of Auschwitz survivors (adults and children) taken in the first hours and days of their liberation, as well as scenes of their evacuation, which took place weeks or months later. The film includes the first inspection of the camp by Soviet war crimes investigators, as well as the initial medical examination of the survivors by Soviet physicians. It also records the public burial ceremony that took place on February 28, 1945 for Auschwitz victims who died just before and after the liberation. The order to make the film was issued by Mikhael Oschurkow, head of the photography unit, and was carried out by Alexander Voronzow and others in his group. Eighteen minutes of the film was introduced as evidence at the International Military Tribunal in Nuremberg. Another segment of the film disappeared for forty years before resurfacing in Moscow in 1986.

    [Source: Alexander Voronzow interview, Chronos-Films, The Liberation of Auschwitz, 1986]

    See https://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/media_fi.php?ModuleId=0&MediaId=174.
    See Also https://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005189.
    See Also "Auschwitz Main Camp" in Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos, Volume 1 Part A.

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    National Archives and Records Administration, College Park
    Copyright: Public Domain
    Source Record ID: 242-1054--box 111--file 1238-39
    Centre de Documentation Juive Contemporaine
    Copyright: Exclusively with source

    Keywords & Subjects

    Record last modified:
    2017-06-05 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa14269

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