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An American investigator from the 79th Infantry Division, U.S. Ninth Army, questions Walther Burstedde, who earlier confessed to beating an American pilot on 24 March 1945. Burstedde was one of several Germans accused of beating the crew of an American bomber, an act cited in the case of Reimoller on 2 May 1945.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 77593

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    An American investigator from the 79th Infantry Division, U.S. Ninth Army, questions Walther Burstedde, who earlier confessed to beating an American pilot on 24 March 1945. Burstedde was one of several Germans accused of beating the crew of an American bomber, an act cited in the case of Reimoller on 2 May 1945.
    An American investigator from the 79th Infantry Division, U.S. Ninth Army, questions Walther Burstedde, who earlier confessed to beating an American pilot on 24 March 1945. Burstedde was one of several Germans accused of beating the crew of an American bomber, an act cited in the case of Reimoller on 2 May 1945.

When U.S. Ninth Army troops captured the concentration camp for Soviet civilians located near Recklinghausen, Germany, they converted it into a separation center for prisoners of war and war criminals.  After the first German prisoners arrived at the camp they were sent to the interrogation department, which was supervised by Captain Harold Puttfer and Lieutenant H. Goodman.  The camp had three sections called "cages."  One of these was for women, another for persons incarcerated for minor offenses, and the third for hardened criminals.  All three sections were filled to capacity, totalling 20,000 prisoners.

    Overview

    Caption
    An American investigator from the 79th Infantry Division, U.S. Ninth Army, questions Walther Burstedde, who earlier confessed to beating an American pilot on 24 March 1945. Burstedde was one of several Germans accused of beating the crew of an American bomber, an act cited in the case of Reimoller on 2 May 1945.

    When U.S. Ninth Army troops captured the concentration camp for Soviet civilians located near Recklinghausen, Germany, they converted it into a separation center for prisoners of war and war criminals. After the first German prisoners arrived at the camp they were sent to the interrogation department, which was supervised by Captain Harold Puttfer and Lieutenant H. Goodman. The camp had three sections called "cages." One of these was for women, another for persons incarcerated for minor offenses, and the third for hardened criminals. All three sections were filled to capacity, totalling 20,000 prisoners.
    Photographer
    A.R. Pilgrene
    Date
    1945 May 03
    Locale
    Recklinghausen, [Prussia; North Rhine-Westphalia] Germany
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration, College Park

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    National Archives and Records Administration, College Park
    Copyright: Public Domain
    Source Record ID: 153-Case files 1944-49--box 311--file 12-584

    Keywords & Subjects

    Record last modified:
    1998-08-27 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa8200

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