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While on an inspection tour of the newly liberated Ohrdruf concentration camp, General Dwight Eisenhower and a party of high ranking U.S. Army officers, including Generals Bradley, Patton, and Eddy, view the charred remains of prisoners that were burned upon a section of railroad track during the evacuation of the camp.

Photograph | Photograph Number: 77811

While on an inspection tour of the newly liberated Ohrdruf concentration camp, General Dwight Eisenhower and a party of high ranking U.S. Army officers, including Generals Bradley, Patton, and Eddy, view the charred remains of prisoners that were burned upon a section of railroad track during the evacuation of the camp.

Also pictured is Jules Grad (second from the left taking notes), correspondent for the "Stars and Stripes" U.S. Army newspaper and Alois J. Liethen of Appleton, WI, the mustached soldier who served as the interpreter for the tour of Ohrdruf.

The original Signal Corps caption reads, "GENERAL EISENHOWER SEES NAZI ATROCITIES. Following discovery of a Nazi SS murder camp at Ohrdruf, Germany, by advancing troops of the Fourth Armored Division, Third U.S. Army, April 4, 1945, General of the Army Dwight D. Eisenhower, Supreme Commander-in-Chief Allied Expeditionary Force, went personally to the scene to inspect evidences of atrocities. He was accompanied by a party of high-ranking U.S. officers, including General Omar N. Bradley, Commanduing General of the 12th Army Group, and Lieutenant General George S. Patton, Jr., Commanding General of the Third U.S. Army.

American soldiers who seized the camp found the camp littered with the bodies of Czechoslovakian, Russian, Belgian and French slave laborers, slain because they were too weak and feeble to be evacuated. In a shed, they found a stack of 44 naked, lime-covered bodies. According to survivors, 3,000 to 4,000 prisoner had been killed by Nazi SS troops, 70 being slain just before arrival of the Americans. Eighty survivors had excaped death or removal by hiding in the woods nearby. They reported that an average of 150 died daily, mainly from shooting or clubbing. The Nazi system was to feed prisoners on a crust of bread daily, put them to work on tunnelling projects until they were too weak to continue, then exterminate them and replace them with another 150 prisoners daily.

BIPPA FRA 202608

THIS PHOTO SHOWS: General Dwight D. Eisenhower, accompanied by high-ranking U.S Army officers, views the charred bodies of prisoners burned at Ohrdruf. U.S. Signal Corps Photo ETO-HQ-45-25679. RESERVICED BY LONDON OWI TO LIST B
CERTIFIED AS PASSED BY SHAEF CENSOR

Date
1945 April 12
Photo Credit
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Harold Royall
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Record last modified: 2012-11-09 00:00:00
This page: https://collections.ushmm.org/search/catalog/pa8470