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Adolf Bartels and the institutions of literary extremism in Germany, 1871-1945 / by Steven Nyole Fuller

Publication | Digitized | Library Call Number: PT2603.A572 Z65 1990

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    Overview

    Summary
    Adolf Bartels (1862-1945) was the most notorious anti-Semitic literary critic in German history. However, because of his rabid nationalism, Bartels's influence on late 19th and early 20th Century aesthetic and political life has been entirely underestimated. Bartels is representative of an entire range of intellectuals whose work helped formulate National Socialist ideology. The individuals with whom Bartels associated included such diverse figures as Gerhart Hauptmann, Ferdinand Avenarius, Johannes Becher and Adolf Hitler, to name just a few. My dissertation uses the biography of Bartels to portray the literary climate in Germany from the Grunderjahre to the defeat of National Socialism. The individual study of Bartels provides an illuminating test case for the analysis of intellectual life during this period.
    Format
    Book
    Author/Creator
    Fuller, Steven Nyole, 1960-
    Published
    1990
    Notes
    Thesis (Ph. D.)--Stanford University, 1990.
    Includes bibliographical references (p. 257-309).
    Photocopy. Ann Arbor, Mich. : UMI Dissertation Services, 1997. 23 cm.

    Physical Details

    Language
    English
    Additional Form
    Electronic version(s) available internally at USHMM.
    Physical Description
    viii, 309 p.

    Keywords & Subjects

    Record last modified:
    2018-05-22 11:46:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/bib27044

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