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A comparative study of stress and coping strategies of adult children of Holocaust survivors and adult children of non-Holocaust survivors / by Steven Aaron Herskovic

Publication | Library Call Number: RC451.4.H62 H57 1989

The problem. The survivors of the Nazi Holocaust suffer from "survivor's syndrome," a constellation of psychological symptoms resulting from Nazi persecution. The survivor-parents may have modeled ineffective strategies for coping with stress. The purpose of this study was to determine how Adult Children of Holocaust Survivors might differ from Adult Children of Non-Holocaust Survivors in their ways of coping with stress. Method. The study compared 49 Adult Children of Holocaust Survivors with 47 Adult Children of Non-Holocaust Survivors. All data were secured from voluntary subjects who resided in California, were Jewish, 24-48 years of age, and had one parent 60 years or older. All subjects completed a demographic data questionnaire. The revised Ways of Coping Questionnaire and five problem vignettes were given to each subject, face-to-face. Three strategies for coping with stress were assessed. These were: (1) emotion-focused coping strategies which operate on internal processes to reduce psychological tension; (2) problem-focused coping strategies which operate on external processes to reduce psychological tension; and (3) social-support coping strategies in which a person asks for emotional support or help. Results. The first hypothesis, which predicted that the Adult Children of Holocaust Survivors would manifest significantly higher emotion-focused coping strategies than the Adult Children of Non-Holocaust Survivors, was not supported. The second hypothesis, which predicted that the Adult Children of Holocaust Survivors would demonstrate significantly lower problem-focused coping strategies than the Adult Children of Non-Holocaust Survivors, was not supported. The third hypothesis, which predicted that the Adult Children of Holocaust Survivors would demonstrate a significantly lower utilization of social-support than the Adult Children of Non-Holocaust Survivors, was supported. Correlation coefficients were statistically significant at the 0.05 level of confidence.

Format
Book
Author/Creator
Herskovic, Steven Aaron.
Published
1989
Includes bibliographical references (p. 145-153)
Language
English
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Record last modified: 2018-05-29 16:28:00
This page: https://collections.ushmm.org/search/catalog/bib32156