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Acculturation patterns in survivors of the Holocaust and children of survivors of the Holocaust / by Barbara Weismann

Publication | Library Call Number: RC451.4.H62 W45 1986

The purpose of this study was twofold; to examine and compare acculturation patterns in four groups of individuals--camp survivors of the Holocaust, non-camp survivors, children of camp survivors, and children of non-camp survivors. Additionally, levels of Jewish identity were compared with acculturation patterns of the subjects across groups. Acculturation patterns were assessed via a scale which distinguished between the degree of assimilation of dominant cultural practices and the degree of retention of native cultural customs. Jewish identity was measured through the use of a scale tapping many dimensions of Jewish identity. The study utilized a cross-sectional, non-experimental design. Ninety-four subjects who met research criteria were involved in the study. The four groups were comprised as follows: 20 camp survivors, 24 non-camp survivors, 26 children of camp survivors, and 24 children of non-camp survivors. The study was designed to test five hypotheses. The first stated that camp survivors would be more culturally resistant and culturally incorporated, and less culturally shifted than non-camp survivors. This hypothesis was not statistically supported but the results were in the direction predicted. Hypothesis 2 stated that camp survivors would be more culturally resistant and culturally incorporated and less culturally shifted than children of camp survivors. This hypothesis was supported strongly, indicating not only the expected generational trend, but also raising questions for future study about the relationship between transmission of psychopathology and transmission of acculturation patterns. Hypothesis 3 stated that children of camp survivors would be more culturally resistant and culturally incorporated and less culturally shifted than children of non-camp survivors. This was partially supported in that children of camp survivors were significantly less culturally shifted than their non-camp counterpart. There were no major differences between groups in terms of cultural resistance and cultural incorporation, although the differences were in the directions predicted. Hypothesis 4 and 5 stated that there would be a correlation between high levels of Jewish identity and cultural resistance and, conversely, that there would be a correlation between low levels of Jewish identity and cultural shift. Both of these hypotheses were supported. Future studies are needed to reexamine this issue with refined instrumentation, and for further exploration in the areas of acculturation patterns. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.)

Format
Book
Author/Creator
Weismann, Barbara.
Published
1986
Includes bibliographical references (p. 50-56)
Language
English
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Record last modified: 2018-05-29 16:28:00
This page: https://collections.ushmm.org/search/catalog/bib32164