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Henry Ford's anti-semitism : a rhetorical analysis of the "paranoid" style / by Jeff Farrell.

Publication | Digitized | Library Call Number: DS146.U6 F37 1999

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    Overview

    Summary
    The life and rhetoric of Henry Ford was examined in this study in order to gain an understanding why, and how, he propagated the longest running anti-Semitic campaign in history. A synergy of two existing theories in communication, Hofstadter (1966) and Smith (1977) provided the appropriate framework for this study. Their observations of high-profile figures being labeled as politically "paranoid" were adapted to Henry Ford. This thesis labels Ford as a "paranoid" by identifying that: (1) Ford perceived a conspiracy; (2) a crusade was needed to defeat the conspiracy; (3) Ford was a militant leader; and, (4) the enemy was powerful. This thesis shows that the anti-Semitic rhetoric of Ford followed specific patterns and had far-reaching implications.
    Format
    Book
    Author/Creator
    Farrell, Jeff.
    Published
    1999
    Notes
    Includes bibliographical references (leaves 100-104).
    Photocopy. Ann Arbor, Mich. : UMI Dissertation Services, 2002. 23 cm.
    Dissertations and Theses

    Physical Details

    Language
    English
    Additional Form
    Electronic version(s) available internally at USHMM.
    Physical Description
    vi, 105 p.

    Keywords & Subjects

    Record last modified:
    2018-04-24 16:01:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/bib71748

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