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William U. Holocaust testimony (HVT-1904) interviewed by Toby Blum-Dobkin

Oral History | Fortunoff Collection ID: HVT-1904

Videotape testimony of William U., who was born in the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy (later southeastern Poland) in 1913. He describes two older brothers emigrating, one prior to his birth; attending public school; antisemitic harassment; joining Zionist groups; attending school in Lʹviv and Warsaw; teaching; Polish military draft; German invasion; being wounded; hospitalization; German takeover of the military hospital; release after three months; traveling to the Soviet zone; arrest in Przemyśl; release when his identity was verified; returning home; teaching in Lʹviv; German invasion in June 1941; ghettoization; a non-Jewish former student providing him with documents as a non-Jew; helping Jewish friends hide; traveling to Legionowo, then Warsaw; returning to Lʹviv; hiding in his former building superintendent's cellar; capture; incarceration in Janowska; escape the next day; hiding again; liberation by Soviet troops; a Pole shooting him after learning he was Jewish; Metropolitan Andriĭ Sheptyt︠s︡ḱyĭ providing medical help; finding a niece; traveling to Berlin, then Łódź; living in Schlachtensee displaced persons camp; assistance from the Joint; and emigrating to the United States in 1946 (he met his brother). Mr. U. discusses wanting to help others since so many helped him survive and the importance of providing a Jewish heritage to his daughters. He shows photographs.

Author/Creator
U., William, 1913-
Published
New York, N.Y. : A Living Memorial to the Holocaust-Museum of Jewish Heritage, 1991
Interview Date
April 13, 1991.
Language
English
Copies
2 copies: 3/4 in. dub; and 1/2 in. VHS with time coding.
Cite As
William U. Holocaust Testimony (HVT-1904). Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies, Yale University Library.