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Esther K. Holocaust testimony (HVT-2054) interviewed by Joni-Sue Blinderman,

Oral History | Fortunoff Collection ID: HVT-2054

Videotape testimony of Esther K., who was born in Seredne, Czechoslovakia in 1922, the tenth of eleven children. She remembers one brother's emigration to the United States; Hungarian occupation; anti-Jewish laws resulting in confiscation of her father's business; moving to Budapest, then Debrecen; returning to Seredne in 1944; ghettoization in a brick factory in Ungvár (Uz︠h︡horod); deportation to Auschwitz in spring 1944; passing through a selection with her mother, sister, and other relatives; her sister, mother, and sister-in-law being taken in subsequent selections; pledging to remain with her two nieces; their transfer to Frankfurt in August, then Ravensbrück in December; arduous slave labor; evacuation in March 1945; brief detention near Berlin; liberation in Hamburg by the Swedish Red Cross; transfer to Malmö, Sweden via Denmark; recovering in Landskrona; the kindness of the Swedish people; and emigration to the United States in 1946. Mrs. K. recalls reunion with her brother; learning only one brother had survived; marriage in 1947; and the births of three sons. Mrs. K. discusses recurring nightmares of dogs and SS; difficulty believing what was happening when she was in camp; and the importance to her survival of being with her nieces. She shows photographs.

Author/Creator
K., Esther, 1922-
Published
New York, N.Y. : A Living Memorial to the Holocaust-Museum of Jewish Heritage, 1992
Interview Date
April 29, 1992.
Locale
Ukraine
Uz︠h︡horod
Czechoslovakia
Serednje (Zakarpatsʹka oblastʹ, Ukraine)
Budapest (Hungary)
Debrecen (Hungary)
Hamburg (Germany)
Denmark
Malmö (Sweden)
Landskrona (Sweden)
Language
English
Copies
2 copies: and 1/2 in. VHS with time coding.
Cite As
Esther K. Holocaust Testimony (HVT-2054). Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies, Yale University Library.