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Rabbi Armin F. Holocaust testimony (HVT-297) interviewed by Robert Prince and Susanna Neuman

Oral History | Fortunoff Collection ID: HVT-297

Video testimony of Rabbi Armin F., who was born in Bratislava, Czechoslovakia in 1926. Mr. F. describes growing up in a small town near Bratislava; Hungarian occupation; studying at Yeshivoth; and his first awareness of danger when a Purim festival was cancelled in Bratislava because of the Anschluss. He recalls German occupation of Budapest, where he had been studying; increased restrictions on Jews; ghettoization; deportation with his family to Auschwitz in May 1944; separation from them; and incarceration in the Zigeunerlager (Gypsy Lager). He discusses Nazi methods of dehumanizing the prisoners; camp hierarchy and rules; arranging to see his mother and sister in Auschwitz; his group of friends who always helped each other; and transfer to Mühldorf in September 1944. He recounts forced labor in a forest camp; transport on a train where he met his mother and sister; liberation by Americans; being taken for dead and saved because his mother wanted to see his body; return to Bratislava; emigration to the United States; and education and ordination as a rabbi. Mr. F. discusses his work as an educator; integrating his concentration camp uniform cap into his Seder; teaching a course on the Holocaust at Brooklyn College; and his children. He emphasizes the dehumanizing effects of arrival at Auschwitz; the constant and excruciating hunger; and refusal of Hungarian Jews to recognize their fate at the hands of the Germans.

Author/Creator
F., Armin, 1926-
Published
New York, N.Y. : Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies at Yale, 1984
Interview Date
November 11, 1984.
Language
English
Copies
3 copies: 3/4 in. master; 3/4 in. dub; and 1/2 in. VHS with time coding.
Cite As
Rabbi Armin F. Holocaust Testimony (HVT-297). Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies, Yale University Library.