Advanced Search

Learn About The Holocaust

Special Collections

My Saved Research

Login

Register

Help

Skip to main content

Metal grave marker of a Jewish woman who was killed in Djakovo labor camp

Object | Accession Number: 2012.319.1

Search this record's additional resources, such as finding aids, documents, or transcripts.

No results match this search term.
Check spelling and try again.

results are loading

0 results found for “keyward

    Overview

    Brief Narrative
    Metal grave marker inscribed with the name of Horic Haistro, age 70, originally from Sarajevo, that was placed in the Jewish cemetery of the former Djakovo labor camp in Dakovo in eastern Croatia after World War II (1939-1945.) In April 1941, Yugoslavia was dismembered by Nazi Germany and its allies. The fanatical, fascist Ustasa organization declared the creation of the Independent State of Croatia. The Ustasa established several concentration camps to separate and murder Jews, Serbs, Roma, and other ethnic and religious minorities, as well as political opponents. The Djakovo camp, on the grounds of a former flour mill, was used to incarcerate Jewish children and women, and a small number of Serbians, from December 1941 - June 1942. Nearly 4000 people were sent to the camp and nearly 600 died, chiefly of malnutrition and typhus. There were two major transports to the camp. In December 1941, a transport of 1830 Jewish children and women, and 50 Serbian girls, arrived in the camp. In February 1942, 1200 women were shipped from Stara Gradiska concentration camp to Djakovo. Beginning December 9, 1941, those who died were buried in a Jewish cemetery near the camp. Despite orders that the graves were to be unmarked, Stephan Kolb (1886-1945), the gravedigger at the Jewish cemetery from 1910-1945, secretly kept a list of where each victim was buried. After the war ended in May 1945, approximately 590 individual markers were placed on the graves identifying the name, town, and age of the victim. The Jewish Community of Sarajevo began a project in 2011 to replace the original grave markers which were deteriorating due to the weather, and donated the original markers to family members and museums.
    Date
    creation:  after 1945
    Geography
    use: Djakovo (Concentration camp), Jewish cemetery; Dakovo (Croatia)
    Credit Line
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Collection, Gift of the Jewish Community of Sarajevo
    Contributor
    Subject: Horic Haestro
    Biography
    Horic Haestro was born in 1872 in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia. In April 1941, Yugoslavia was dismembered by Nazi Germany and its allies. The fanatical, fascist Ustasa organization declared the creation of the Independent State of Croatia. The Ustasa established several concentration camps to separate and murder Jews, Serbs, Roma, other minorities, and political opponents. The Djakovo camp was used to incarcerate Jewish children and women, and a small number of Serbians, from December 1941 - June 1942. Horic was imprisoned in Djakovo after December 1941. She died there, age 70, before July 1942.

    Physical Details

    Language
    Croatian
    Classification
    Jewish Art and Symbolism
    Object Type
    Grave markers (aat)
    Physical Description
    Rectangular metal sheet, 8.375 x 12.625 inches, with a narrow horizontal shelf with a small vertical lip at the lower edge. The sign is riveted in the center to a long, narrow metal stake with a pointed tip that was inserted into the ground. The front of the sign has an inscription handwritten in white paint. The sign is heavily corroded with flaking.
    Dimensions
    overall: Height: 27.750 inches (70.485 cm) | Width: 12.625 inches (32.068 cm) | Depth: 1.375 inches (3.493 cm)
    Materials
    overall : metal, paint
    Inscription
    front, white paint : HAESTRO HORIC / SARAJEVO 70 nj.

    Rights & Restrictions

    Conditions on Access
    No restrictions on access
    Conditions on Use
    No restrictions on use

    Keywords & Subjects

    Administrative Notes

    Provenance
    The grave marker was donated to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in 2012 by the Jewish Community of Sarajevo.
    Record last modified:
    2023-05-30 10:22:29
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/irn51084

    Download & Licensing

    In-Person Research

    Contact Us