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Lindemann family in Braunchsweig

Film | Digitized | Accession Number: 2018.633 | RG Number: RG-60.1923 | Film ID: 4247

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    Lindemann family in Braunchsweig

    Overview

    Description
    Ethel and her daughter Karin with gloves hanging from her wrists walk down an avenue. The girl smiles and waves. Ethel, Karin, and Oda walk out the front door of a house with their dog. They play, throw snow. Rows of houses with snow-covered roofs. The family dances happily. “ENDE”
    Duration
    00:00:51
    Date
    Event:  1942
    Locale
    Braunschweig, Germany
    Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, gift of Dave Coseo on behalf of Oda (Lindemann) Coseo and Karin Lindemann
    Contributor
    Camera Operator: Hans W. Lindemann
    Biography
    Hans Wolfgang Lindemann (a German) married Ethel McGloclin (an American) in Philadelphia in 1929. He had come to the US looking for work, but had a strong German family heritage and served in the German army in WWI as a radio operator. After his father died, the couple moved to Germany (Braunschweig), toured Europe, and started a family (Oda b. 1934 and Karin b. 1936). Wolfgang joined the German reserve as he found that the least difficult way to protect himself and his family. He worked in a truck factory which was vital to the German war effort. Later, he became a Wehrmacht captain as an automotive engineer. He was discharged in November 1944 and later became a prisoner of war of the Americans in France. Wolfgang's two brothers also served in the German military in WWII. Ethel raised their two girls in a small farming town in Germany. She exchanged letters with Wolfgang as well as with her brother who was serving in the US Army. She kept a diary in English during the war period. In 1946, Ethel and the girls returned to the United States (Oda was 12 and lives in Philadelphia; Karin died in 1976 at age 40).

    Physical Details

    Language
    Silent
    Genre/Form
    Amateur.
    B&W / Color
    Black & White
    Image Quality
    Good
    Film Format
    • Master
    • Master 4247 Film: positive - 9.5 mm - b&w
      Master 4247 Film: positive - 9.5 mm - b&w
      Master 4247 Film: positive - 9.5 mm - b&w
      Master 4247 Film: positive - 9.5 mm - b&w
    • Original
    • Original 4245 Film: canisters - 9.5 mm
      Original 4246 Film: canisters - 9.5 mm
      Original 4247 Film: canisters - 9.5 mm
      Original 4245 Film: canisters - 9.5 mm
      Original 4246 Film: canisters - 9.5 mm
      Original 4247 Film: canisters - 9.5 mm
      Original 4245 Film: canisters - 9.5 mm
      Original 4246 Film: canisters - 9.5 mm
      Original 4247 Film: canisters - 9.5 mm
      Original 4245 Film: canisters - 9.5 mm
      Original 4246 Film: canisters - 9.5 mm
      Original 4247 Film: canisters - 9.5 mm

    Rights & Restrictions

    Conditions on Access
    You do not require further permission from the Museum to access this archival media.
    Copyright
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Conditions on Use
    The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum places no restrictions on use of this material. You do not require further permission from the Museum to reproduce or use this film footage.

    Keywords & Subjects

    Administrative Notes

    Film Provenance
    Dave Coseo donated his grandfather's original films to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in May 2016.
    Note
    Ethel kept a diary in English documenting her experiences raising the girls in Germany while her husband, Hans Wolfgang Lindemann, served his country as Wehrmacht captain. Refer to USHMM Film and Video files for a copy of the diary.

    For example, on April 16, 1945, Ethel writes:
    "Yesterday there was fighting in Bamberg, so I supposed that exquisite structure will also fall to ruins. What does it matter one church more or less. This war has not only destroyed churches, it has undermined the foundation of Christendom. Years ago I denied the devil and hell and sought God in whose existence I firmly believed. Now I am convinced that there is hell and a devil and have lost faith in the existence of a God, else how could he suffer such terror and injustice to reign on earth? How shall men keep to their moral principles who have become accustomed to the flying death, to destruction, to a carelessness of human life, for whom human beings are only common feed or so many animals to torture at will? Can order and justice return to the world? Is not civilization set back a thousand years or more already. Life has become primitive, men live in cellars or caves and their household implements destroyed, are taking to constructing primative …. Last week Hans made a kerosene lamp out of two bottles and a peice of brass pipe. We are learning to make our own butter, cheese, and soon will have to bake bread as the village baker is captive, the Mill in Rummingers which supplied our flour is destroyed. I have made starch out of potatoes all winter. We still have supplies but where shall more come from when they are gone?"
    Film Source
    Dave Coseo
    Record last modified:
    2024-02-21 08:05:44
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/irn560129

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