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Factory-printed Star of David badge printed with Jood worn by a Jewish person

Object | Accession Number: 2016.496.3

Factory-printed Star of David badge, owned by a Jewish person in the Netherlands. Germany invaded the Netherlands in May 1940. On April 29, 1942, all Jews in the Netherlands were required to wear a badge, which consisted of a yellow Star of David with a black outline and the word “Jew” printed inside the star in Dutch. The badge was used to stigmatize and control the Jewish population. Duplicated from those printed in Germany, these badges were made by factories such as De Nijverheid, a formerly Jewish-owned firm in the Netherlands that printed a large amount of Dutch stars. In the summer of 1942, German officials began deporting Jews from the Netherlands—primarily from Westerbork transit camp—to Auschwitz in German-occupied Poland. Although a number of Jews went into hiding with the assistance of the Dutch underground, less than 25 percent of Jews from the Netherlands survived the Holocaust.

Date
use:  after 1942 April 29
Geography
use: Netherlands.
Language
Dutch
Classification
Identifying Artifacts
Category
Badges
Genre/Form
Magen David.
Credit Line
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Collection, Gift of Irene Frank
 
Record last modified: 2020-06-30 09:24:09
This page: https://collections.ushmm.org/search/catalog/irn561077