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Leather clutch purse owned by Runia Korman Maizels

Object | Accession Number: 2018.63.2

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    Leather clutch purse owned by Runia Korman Maizels
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    Overview

    Brief Narrative
    Leather clutch purse used by Runia and Szlama Majzels (later Samuel Maizels) when they emigrated from Hamburg, Germany, to Baltimore, Maryland in 1950. Runia and Szlama were both born in Kraśnik, Poland. German forces occupied Kraśnik on September 15. Runia was transported from Kraśnik to Lublin on February 9, 1941. At some point, Runia likely lived under the false identity of “Jozefa,” and was in several forced labor camps. She was liberated from Bergen-Belsen on April 15, 1945 by the British Army. She was reunited with her husband, Szlama, in Hamburg after the war. He was a survivor of Gross-Rosen and the Brünnlitz subcamp where he worked in Oskar Schindler’s arms factory. Their daughter, Noma (Naomi), was born in Hamburg in 1947. The family immigrated to the United States in December 1950, and settled in Baltimore, Maryland. They changed their last name from Majzels to Maizels, and Szlama changed his name to Samuel. They had two more children: Harvey (b. 1952) and Frances (b. 1956). Several members of Runia and Szlama’s families were imprisoned in the Budzyń labor camp near Krasnik, and died around November 1942.
    Date
    use:  approximately 1950
    Geography
    use: Germany.
    Credit Line
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Collection, Gift of Frances Maizels Rifkin, in memory of her parents Runia Korman Maizels and Szlama Maizels.
    Contributor
    Subject: Runia K. Maizels
    Subject: Szlama Maizels
    Biography
    Runia Korman Maizels (1918-1985) was born Runia Korman on September 19, 1918 in Kraśnik, Poland, to Kiwa and Noma Brucha Korman (née Goldner). Her father Kiwa Korman (circa 1887-1942) was the son of Josef Hersch Korman and Sura Chana Korman (née Akierman, b. circa 1889). Runia had one sister Chana (later Chana Kucheik, 1920-1942) and a brother, Abraham (1922-1942).

    In September 1939, Poland was invaded by Germany and the Soviet Union. Kraśnik was occupied by the German Army on September 15, 1939. Runia married Szlama Majzels (1916-1958) on August 26, 1940. Runia was transported from Kraśnik to Lublin on February 9, 1941. At some point, Runia likely lived under the false-identity of “Jozefa,” and was in several forced-labor camps. She was liberated from Bergen-Belsen on April 15, 1945 by the British Army. Runia’s siblings and parents were all killed in the Majdanek subcamp Budzyń in fall 1942.

    She was reunited with her husband Szlama in Hamburg after the war. He was a survivor of Gross-Rosen and the Brünnlitz subcamp where he worked in Oskar Schindler’s arms factory. Their daughter, Noma (Naomi), was born in Hamburg on March 8, 1947. The family immigrated to the United States in December 1950 and settled in Baltimore, Maryland. They changed their last name from Majzels to Maizels, and Szlama changed his name to Samuel. They had two more children: Harvey (b. 1952) and Frances (b. 1956). After Runia’s husband’s death, she married Alex Jacobs (born Alkun Jakubowicz, 1912-1997), a Holocaust survivor originally from Kalisz, Poland.
    Szlama Maizels (later Samuel, 1916-1958) was born in Krasnik, Poland, to Chaim Ezril and Fajga (nee Halpern) Majzels. Szlama had a younger brother, Szulim (Shulom,1925-1942). He worked as a furrier. In September 1939, Poland was invaded by Germany and the Soviet Union. Kraśnik was occupied by the German Army on September 15, 1939. On August 26, 1940, Szlama married Runia Korman (1918-1985), who was also born in Krasnik.

    During the war, Szlama was imprisoned for a time in Gross Rosen concentration camp, where he was assigned prisoner number 69257. On October 21, 1944, Szlama was one of 700 men transferred to the Brünnlitz subcamp to work at Oskar Schindler’s arms factory in German-occupied Czechoslovakia. Soviet troops entered the camp on May 10, three days after the German surrender. His brother, Szulim, and several other relatives were killed in the Majdanek subcamp Budzyń in fall 1942.

    Szlama was reunited with his wife, Runia, after the war in Hamburg. At some point, Runia had likely lived under the false-identity of “Jozefa,” and was in several forced-labor camps. She was liberated from Bergen-Belsen on April 15, 1945 by the British Army. Their daughter, Noma (Naomi), was born in Hamburg on March 8, 1947. The family immigrated to the United States in December 1950 and settled in Baltimore, Maryland. They changed their last name from Majzels to Maizels, and Szlama changed his name to Samuel. They had two more children: Harvey (b. 1952) and Frances (b. 1956). After Szlama’s death, she married Alex Jacobs (born Alkun Jakubowicz, 1912-1997), a Holocaust survivor originally from Kalisz, Poland.

    Physical Details

    Classification
    Dress Accessories
    Object Type
    Handbags (lcsh)
    Physical Description
    Rectangular, brown leather, clutch purse with a flap and tab closure. The front and back sides are constructed with leather layered over dark gray fiber padding, a medium gray felted layer, and lined with the light brown cloth on the interior. The bottom half of the front is reinforced with a rectangular panel which has a small rectangle tab with a curved top partially sewn over the top edge, creating a tab for the top flap to tuck into. The accordion sides, base, and flap have beige paper between the leather and the lining. The top flap is stitched to the back panel along the top edge. The interior has two, layered, rectangular pockets made from the lining fabric, and a strip of dark brown leather with angled corners, sewn to the back panel. The leather is dry and brittle, and most of the dark brown coloring has worn off. The front tab has partially torn off, revealing the interior layers. The clutch is torn along the flap creases, along the seams, and through the center of the right accordion side. The paper and cloth linings are severely torn, the stitches on the bottom are coming apart, and the interior pockets have become partially detached. Some of the tears have been hastily repaired with large hand stitches with black and white threads.
    Dimensions
    overall: Height: 8.500 inches (21.59 cm) | Width: 11.500 inches (29.21 cm) | Depth: 2.500 inches (6.35 cm)
    Materials
    overall : leather, cloth, thread, paper, fiber

    Rights & Restrictions

    Conditions on Access
    No restrictions on access
    Conditions on Use
    No restrictions on use

    Keywords & Subjects

    Administrative Notes

    Provenance
    The clutch was donated to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in 2018 by Frances Maizels Rifkin, the daughter of Runia Korman Maizels and Szlama Maizels.
    Record last modified:
    2023-12-13 14:06:54
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/irn595124

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