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German civilians carry the body of one of 200 Russian prisoners, exhumed from a mass grave in Wuelfel, to a new grave near Hanover City Hall.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 20827

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    German civilians carry the body of one of 200 Russian prisoners, exhumed from a mass grave in Wuelfel, to a new grave near Hanover City Hall.
    German civilians carry the body of one of 200 Russian prisoners, exhumed from a mass grave in Wuelfel, to a new grave near Hanover City Hall.

On April 8, 1945, 200 Red Army officers and other prisoners of war were sent on a death march from the Liebenau labor camp, 50 kilometers NW of Hanover, where the prisoners worked in a munitions factory.  As they reached Wuelfel, a suburb of Hanover, the SS guards ordered 25 prisoners, including one woman, to dig a large grave.  While this was being done, a prisoner killed a guard with a shovel and was able to escape to the woods nearby.  From there he heard the shots as the remaining prisoners were killed and buried in the grave.  Several weeks later, as American troops swept through the area, the mass grave was discovered.  On May 2, the 35th Division of the U.S. Ninth Army gathered townspeople from Wuelfel and forced them to exhume the grave, wrap the bodies in sheets, and rebury them near the Hanover City Hall.  Before reburial, many of the victims were identified by friends and relatives remaining in the area.

    Overview

    Caption
    German civilians carry the body of one of 200 Russian prisoners, exhumed from a mass grave in Wuelfel, to a new grave near Hanover City Hall.

    On April 8, 1945, 200 Red Army officers and other prisoners of war were sent on a death march from the Liebenau labor camp, 50 kilometers NW of Hanover, where the prisoners worked in a munitions factory. As they reached Wuelfel, a suburb of Hanover, the SS guards ordered 25 prisoners, including one woman, to dig a large grave. While this was being done, a prisoner killed a guard with a shovel and was able to escape to the woods nearby. From there he heard the shots as the remaining prisoners were killed and buried in the grave. Several weeks later, as American troops swept through the area, the mass grave was discovered. On May 2, the 35th Division of the U.S. Ninth Army gathered townspeople from Wuelfel and forced them to exhume the grave, wrap the bodies in sheets, and rebury them near the Hanover City Hall. Before reburial, many of the victims were identified by friends and relatives remaining in the area.
    Date
    1945 May 02
    Locale
    Hanover, [Prussian Hanover; Lower Saxony] Germany
    Variant Locale
    Hannover
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration, College Park

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    National Archives and Records Administration, College Park
    Copyright: Public Domain
    Source Record ID: 111-SC-205625 (Album 3209)

    Keywords & Subjects

    Record last modified:
    2018-02-08 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1084357

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