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Top and bottom images: The image at the top shows Hungarian soldiers abandoning their trenches on the front lines as a Soviet tank overruns the barbed wire fortification separating the two armies. The drawing at the bottom captioned "Alarm," shows Hungarian soldiers running back and forth sounding the alarm of the Soviet counteroffensive. The drawings are dated Jan 11 and 13, 1943.

Photograph | Digitized | Photograph Number: 58103

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    Top and bottom images: The image at the top shows Hungarian soldiers abandoning their trenches on the front lines as a Soviet tank overruns the barbed wire fortification separating the two armies. The drawing at the bottom captioned "Alarm," shows Hungarian soldiers running back and forth sounding the alarm of the Soviet counteroffensive. The drawings are dated Jan 11 and 13, 1943.
    Top and bottom images: The image at the top shows Hungarian soldiers abandoning their trenches on the front lines as a Soviet tank overruns the barbed wire fortification separating the two armies.  The drawing at the bottom captioned "Alarm," shows Hungarian soldiers running back and forth sounding the alarm of the Soviet counteroffensive.  The drawings are dated Jan 11 and 13, 1943.

One page of an illustrated album produced by Gyorgy Beifeld (1902-1982), a Hungarian Jew from Budapest, who was drafted into the Munkaszolgalat (Hungarian Labor Service system) and spent more than a year on the Soviet front, from April 1942 through May 1943.  The album contains 402 drawings and watercolors by Byfield, as well as a narrative of his experiences.

    Overview

    Caption
    Top and bottom images: The image at the top shows Hungarian soldiers abandoning their trenches on the front lines as a Soviet tank overruns the barbed wire fortification separating the two armies. The drawing at the bottom captioned "Alarm," shows Hungarian soldiers running back and forth sounding the alarm of the Soviet counteroffensive. The drawings are dated Jan 11 and 13, 1943.

    One page of an illustrated album produced by Gyorgy Beifeld (1902-1982), a Hungarian Jew from Budapest, who was drafted into the Munkaszolgalat (Hungarian Labor Service system) and spent more than a year on the Soviet front, from April 1942 through May 1943. The album contains 402 drawings and watercolors by Byfield, as well as a narrative of his experiences.
    Date
    April 1942 - May 1943
    Locale
    USSR
    Photo Credit
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of George Byfield (Gyorgy Beifeld)

    Rights & Restrictions

    Photo Source
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Copyright: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Provenance: George Byfield (Gyorgy Beifeld)
    Source Record ID: Collections: 2001.156

    Keywords & Subjects

    Administrative Notes

    Biography
    Gyorgy Beifeld (later George W. Byfield) was born in Budapest, Hungary on April 8, 1902. The son of a banker, Gyorgy received a law degree and worked as a stock broker. He was conscripted into the Hungarian Labor Service (Munkaszolgalat ) and served for 13 months on the Soviet front, from April 1942 until May 1943. He was wounded on August 28, 1942 at Prilushkniy. In 1943 Gyorgy returned to Budapest. The following year he appears to have been re-drafted or arrested, because he ended up in Dachau at the conclusion of World War II. After his liberation, he returned to Hungary, but left again after the communist takeover. Gyorgy immigrated to Australia in 1949 and settled in Sydney, where he and his wife later operated a successful tobacco shop. He died in Sydney on June 14, 1982.
    Record last modified:
    2004-02-26 00:00:00
    This page:
    https:​/​/collections.ushmm.org​/search​/catalog​/pa1143329

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