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Frederick Weinstein papers

Document | Accession Number: 2008.321.1

The Fryderyk Winnykamien papers comprise documents and photographs concerning Fryderyk Winnykamien, a Polish born Jew who escaped the Warsaw ghetto and lived in hiding for part of the war and his family in the years during and after the Holocaust. Materials include certification of slave labor, identification cards including Fryderyk’s false identification, correspondence, photographs depicting Fryderyk, his parents and wife at the Duppel displaced persons camp, United States naturalization paperwork, restitution claims, and the diary Fryderyk kept while in hiding in Warsaw between 1943 and 1944.

The Fryderyk Winnykamien papers comprise documents and photographs collected by Fryderyk that document his experiences during and after the Holocaust. Materials include identification cards, correspondence, photographs, restitution paperwork, and a diary Fryderyk kept while in hiding in Warsaw between 1943 and 1944. The identification papers are all from the post war period, with the exception of a certificate stating he was a Jew and a slave laborer at the Ursus factory in 1942 and the false identification Fryderyk obtained while in hiding in 1943. Other forms of identification include travel passes and professional identification and passports for his father, Leopold. Other materials from the immediate post-war period include papers Fryderyk obtained while residing at the Düppel displaced persons camp near Berlin. This includes employment certifications for himself and Leopold. Additionally, most of the photographs comprised here within are images from Düppel. This collection also comprises a diary Fryderyk kept while in hiding in Warsaw between 1943 and 1944. He begins his account with his memories of the German invasion of Poland in 1939 and recounts his escape from Gniewószow, life in the Warsaw ghetto, his family and friends, and his escape from the ghetto in 1943. Upon fleeing his hiding place in 1944, Fryderyk buried his diary in the cellar where he was residing and returned to Warsaw after the war to retrieve it from the rubble. Post-war documents include Fryderyk’s United States naturalization papers and related documents, including his draft registration receipt, intent to become a citizen, and appeal to sponsor his parents immigration to the country. Restitution paperwork for Fryderyk, his parents, and his wife, Ruth is also held in this collection. The correspondence among Fryderyk’s papers is primarily from the 1970s. Most of it is between Fryderyk and his parents and Maria and Boleslaw Paciorek, Christians who were instrumental to Fryderyk’s survival during the war.

Date
inclusive:  1940-1999
bulk:  1944-1947
Extent
1 box
1 oversize box
Credit Line
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Collection, Gift of Frederick Weinstein
 
Record last modified: 2021-05-05 14:07:47
This page: https://collections.ushmm.org/search/catalog/irn35904