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Oral history interview with Nachim Gershkovich Sorkin

Oral History | Accession Number: 1995.A.1283.26 | RG Number: RG-50.378.0026

Some video files begin with 10-60 seconds of color bars.

Nachim Gershkovich Sorkin, born in Mogilev, Belarus in1923, describes growing up in Mogilev with no antisemitism during his youth; hearing rumors and reports of war after 1939; the persecution and imprisonment of Jews; the Germans selecting specialist, such as tailors, drivers, and shoemakers, and sending them to camps; being sent to a camp with his brother; never seeing his father, mother, or older sister again; working in a smith shop for two years from September 1941 to September 1943; the food and the routine in the work camp; the disbandment of the camp in September 1943; how only about 120 of the original 1,000 or so persons in the camp survived; being sent to Minsk for about 10 days; being taken to Lublin, Poland then to Budin with other metal workers; being separated from his brother; his work with the airplane company, Heinkel; being taken in August 1944 to Velichka (Wieliczka), where he worked in salt mines; being taken with other prisoners to a camp in Flossenburg, where they remained a few weeks; being sent to Leitmeritz, where he worked in a metal shop; being sent to Dachau for about a week, sorting shoes, eyeglasses, umbrellas, etc.; going to Augsburg and Leonberg near Stuttgart, which was frequently bombed by Allied planes; making airplane wings in Leonberg; the bombing of camp by Allied planes and the prisoners' reactions; being transferred to Landau, where he worked on an airfield for a month; being marched to various places over a period of three to four days; being told they were free; going to the Soviet zone, where he was interrogated and treated as a possible spy; and going into the army after being cleared.

Interviewee
Nachim G. Sorkin
Date
1995 August 08  (interview)
Language
Russian
Extent
4 videocassettes (U-Matic) : sound, color ; 3/4 in..
Credit Line
Interviews conducted in association with the Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies at Yale University and with the participation of Beit Lohamei Haghetaot in Israel.
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Record last modified: 2018-01-22 10:47:10
This page: https://collections.ushmm.org/search/catalog/irn510597