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Oral history interview with Loukas Dallas

Oral History | Accession Number: 2014.530.8 | RG Number: RG-50.855.0008

Some video files begin with 10-60 seconds of color bars.

Loukas Dallas, born September 24, 1931 in Kastoria in Northwestern Greece, describes his experience as a Greek Christian during the Italian and German occupation, 1941-1945; his family, which was comprised of his parents and three brothers (he was the youngest child); their house, which was on 14 Voriou Ipirou Street, close to the then Jewish neighborhood and what is now the modern Jewish Holocaust Memorial; his father, who was a furrier and did not have Jewish friends; his uncle, who was a textile merchant and had a lot of Jewish business acquaintances; the lack of Jews in his elementary school because Jews had their own school, and the few Jews in his high school, none of whom he was friends with; how Kastoria is known as the “fur capital of Greece” and that trade has been dominated by Christians; his memories of the Jews of Kastoria controlling many other trades, particularly textiles; how the Jews were peaceful and hard-working people and everybody lived in harmony; the antisemitic tales told to children by older Greeks; the Italian occupation of Kastoria; the fear of civilians when the Germans arrived; how shortly after they came, the Germans marked Jewish homes with stars of David and made the Jews wear the Star of David on their breasts; the Germans rounding up the Jews one morning, imprisoning them for a day in the old Officers’ Club building, and then transporting them out of the city on army trucks; how after the war only 35-40 Jews returned; the few names he remembers, including the first names Mousiko, Pepos, Mousoulis, Dennis, and Mortos, as well as Michel Mevora and the Eliaou family; the Eliaou brothers, who were taken to concentration camps and still live in Kastoria; the looting of Jewish homes after the deportation and Christians moving into the homes; the rumors that certain individuals became wealth “because of the Jews” (Mr. Dallas says it was believed that the interlopers found money, gold, and jewelry in the abandoned houses); and the return of the homes to the survivors who came back to Kastoria.

Interviewee
Loukas Dallas
Date
2014 November 13  (interview)
Language
Greek
Extent
1 digital file : MPEG-4.
Credit Line
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Collection, courtesy of the Jeff and Toby Herr Foundation
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Record last modified: 2018-01-22 10:41:33
This page: https://collections.ushmm.org/search/catalog/irn610308